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Bristnall Hall Academy, Bristnall Hall Lane
Oldbury, West Midlands B68 9PA

T: +44 0121 552 5425

E: principal@bha.attrust.org.uk

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Bristnall Hall Academy, Bristnall Hall Lane, Oldbury, West Midlands, B68 9PA

ENGLISH Area Leader: Kim Williams

Assistant Area Leader: Rowena Mitchell

Key Stage 3 co-ordinator: Laura Hadlington

 

Spiritual: Students are provided with opportunities to reflect on their own life and lives of others using diaries, biographies, autobiographies, journals, letters and other non-fiction writing. Students experience a rich variety of quality language use, and learn how to use language in imaginative and original ways, considering how language and meaning changes over time.

 

Moral: Novels and plays are selected that extend students’ ideas and challenge their moral and emotional understanding. Speaking and listening activities develop students’ ability to question and reason, and often focus on real-life issues and situations where what is right or wrong is not universally agreed. Students are encouraged to take different views into account and construct persuasive arguments. Issues of morality are covered in a wide range of prose, non-fiction and Shakespeare texts.

 

Social: Students are provided with opportunities to read texts that portray issues and events relating to contemporary life or past experience in ways that are interesting and challenging. This includes both fiction and non-fiction dealing with issues which young people encounter around them in the world today and look at how we treat others in a modern British society.

 

Cultural: Students study a range of prose, drama, poetry and non-fiction travel writing to encourage empathy and understanding of different cultures. Students also examine their own cultural heritage and identity through introspective writing.

 

BRISTNALL HALL SKILLS AND ATTRIBUTES DEVELOPMENT – Within English, as throughout the Academy, students are provided with opportunities to develop a range of skills and attributes. These include, but are not limited to: high aspirations for themselves; effective communication skills (verbal and written); ability to lead and be a good team player; valuing of diversity and difference; pride and respect in themselves and their community; self-management skills; confidence and resilience; problem solving and negotiation skills.

 

MORE ABLE PUPILS – More Able students are given the opportunity to develop their abilities inside and outside of the classroom. High quality teaching is provided involving thought-provoking and challenging academic material and higher-order questioning. Assessment and personalised feedback aims to help students make rapid and exceptional progress in their reading and writing skills. Enrichment opportunities with poetry and prose writing competitions, theatre visits and the opportunity to work with professional theatre companies enable students to showcase their ability and talent.

KEY STAGE 3

YEAR 7:

Autumn Term:

Creative Writing – A unit that enables students to understand a wider range of punctuation; a variety of sentence types; understand how to structure their own writing; as well as developing a more ambitious vocabulary. Both core challenges will be focused on descriptive and narrative writing and will enable students to use skills they have learnt in order to produce original pieces of creative writing.

Drama – This unit will focus on pieces of Drama from different contexts. The first half of the unit will explore the conventions of Greek Drama and will see students developing their role-playing skills as well as working in a group. The second half of the unit will explore the modern play Blood Brothers. Students will develop their understanding of staging, use of language to convey character as well as developing their own ability to perform in a role. Each core challenge will explore the audience’s reactions to these plays as well as the writers’ methods.

Spring Term:

Class Reader– A unit that focuses on a particular text, where students will focus on studying an author’s use of language and structure. Students will use this as a bridging activity in order to develop the skills they have learnt in KS2. As well as developing their reading skills through language and structural analysis, students will develop their understanding of the methods used by a contemporary author

Sports – This unit will explore a range of sporting heroes and will focus on developing students’ comparative skills. Students will understand a variety of ways to compare texts. In their second core challenge, students will be provided with a statement; they will evaluate this and then express their own opinions on a sporting matter.

Summer Term:

Poetry – This unit will see students studying a range of poems from various poets and developing their understanding of language features. Students will be developing their use of inference and interpretation, as well as the impact language has on the reader. In order to develop their analysis skills, students will be analysing unseen poems. Students will also be creating their own poem focusing on a particular audience and theme, using the conventions they have studied.

Non-fiction – Students will be studying a range of texts from various styles of writing to explore the use of language as well as the impact on the reader and then comparing them. Students will develop an understanding of the different conventions of particular forms, such as speeches and children’s fiction, and they will be applying these conventions in their own writing for their second core challenge.

Additional reading: Students should be encouraged to read a wide range of texts, including fiction and non-fiction in order to develop not only their reading skills, but also their own vocabulary. Students would benefit from reading news articles and adverts, as well as reading stories and poems. Students might also find it useful to look at any plays by Willy Russell as well as looking into his background and other texts by Patrick Ness.

Parental support: Encouraging students to read a range of different texts and reading often, will enable students to begin to develop skills needed in lessons. Students would also benefit from being encouraged to start to use resources available to them to conduct research. Monitoring homework and raising any concerns with members of the English department are also useful ways to provide support.

YEAR 8:

Autumn Term:

Myths and Legends – This unit will see students studying a range of myths and legends by various writers and from different cultures. Students will be developing their comparison skills by exploring differences between texts. In their own writing, students will be developing their use of a range of punctuation and structural techniques in order to create their own myth or legend.

Shakespeare – This unit focuses on two of Shakespeare’s plays: Much Ado About Nothing or Twelfth Night and A Midsummer Night’s Dream. Students will understand the context that Shakespeare was writing in as well as the impact this had on performances and the portrayal of characters. Students will use drama in order to explore the use of language in a play, as well as developing interpretations of various characters.

Spring Term:

Media – This unit will develop skills learnt in the Year 7 non-fiction unit and will focus on the use of language in different types of newspapers. Students will explore the impact language has on the public, as well as how viewpoints are conveyed. As well as analysing language and its impact, students will be applying these skills in order to produce and structure their own article.

Gothic Poetry – A unit that focuses on studying a range of poems from the Gothic genre and developing students’ understanding of conventions and the poets’ techniques. Students will infer meanings from language as well as developing an understanding of the context in which poems were written. Students will also be producing their own gothic short story/poem using language features and by selecting language for effect.

Summer Term:

Class Reader – A unit where students will study a novel and focus on studying a particular author’s use of language and structure. Students will also be developing their analysis of language and their understanding of the effect on the reader. Students will also be able to produce their own evaluative analysis of the text.

Travel Writing – Students will study the conventions of Travel Writing; the writer’s use of language, structure and the writer’s purpose. A range of texts will be studied, each one focusing on a different place. Students will develop their understanding of different countries and cultures as well as the writers’ methods. Writing will also be a focus in this unit, with students creating their own article about a place to visit.

Additional reading: Students should be encouraged to read a wide range of texts, including fiction and non-fiction in order to develop not only their reading skills, but also their vocabulary. Students would benefit from reading news articles, including travel articles and blogs. Students might also find it useful to research different Myths and Legends as well as the context of Shakespeare’s plays.

Parental support: By encouraging students to read widely (both fiction and non-fiction) you will be providing valuable support to your children. Monitoring homework and raising any concerns with members of the English department are also useful ways to provide support.

 

YEAR 9

Students in Year 9 begin to prepare for the skills which will be required at Key Stage 4 in English Language and English Literature. They study a range of Key Stage 4 level texts with a focus on analysis of language and structure, as well as developing comparison and summary skills. Writing continues to be developed in terms of technical accuracy, with a focus on the Key Stage 4 requirements of writing to describe, narrate and persuade.

English LANGUAGE:

Autumn Term: Conflict Students develop their reading skills through the analysis of a range of fiction and non-fiction texts based around the theme of conflict. By studying articles, speeches and extracts from our literary heritage, students will develop their ability to interpret information and ideas, analyse language and structure, as well as compare texts. Students also study the forms and conventions of a range of text types; through this, they develop their ability to write for a given purpose.

Spring Term: Life as a Young Person A range of fiction and non-fiction texts from the 19th, 20th and 21st Centuries are studied. Students develop summary and comparison skills, along with studying the presentation of themes within a text. Students focus on writing to persuade and developing the conventions of this style of writing. This scheme is used to explore the differences in the lives of young people around the world now, as well as throughout different periods in the past.

Summer Term: Relationships- This unit focuses on a range of texts which explore the range of relationships young people encounter: family, friendship, teacher-student and romantic. The focus on this unit is on analysing structure and being able to develop writing skills. The writing in this unit is building on essential writing skills in terms of developing accuracy and nurturing creativity.

 

English LITERATURE:

Autumn Term: Julius Caesar Students study the Shakespeare play Julius Caesar in a way which develops the skills required for their GCSE English Literature course. They will study the play through drama activities, analysing and interpreting key scenes, as well as exploring themes and context. The scheme will get students to evaluate how Shakespeare used language and structural techniques to engage both audiences during the time it was written, as well as contemporary audiences.

Spring Term: Poetry Students will study a range of poems, in order to develop their analytical skills and broaden their knowledge of literary context in preparation for the GCSE course. They will focus on language, structure and form, in order to be able to approach, interpret and analyse unseen poems.

Summer Term: Jekyll and Hyde/ Introduction to 19th century literature- This unit is in preparation for Key Stage 4 English Literature. Students explore the themes, characters and influence of context, as well as the Gothic genre; this prepares them for an assessment in the style of the Key Stage 4 exam.

Additional reading: Students should be encouraged to read as widely as possible in order to develop not only their reading skills, but their vocabulary and understanding of the importance of sentence structures and punctuation within writing. Any Gothic texts or texts by Robert Louis Stevenson would be useful for the unit on Jekyll and Hyde. Similarly, any background reading on Stevenson, Willy Russell or Shakespeare will be beneficial as will reading of other plays by Willy Russell such as Our Day Out or Blood Brothers.

Parental support: By encouraging students to read widely (both fiction and non-fiction) you will be providing valuable support to your children. Monitoring homework and raising any concerns with members of the English department are also useful ways to provide support.

KEY STAGE 4

In Key Stage 4, all pupils study and sit a GCSE in two qualifications – English Language and English Literature (AQA exam board). Both courses are taught by separate teachers, although closely linked across the two years of GCSE.

YEAR 10

GCSE English LANGUAGE:

Autumn Term and Spring Term 1: Back to the Future – Students study a range of non-fiction and fiction texts, reading for meaning and developing their inference and analysis skills. Students are encouraged to formulate their own opinions of the texts they read and to use evidence to support these opinions. The unit provides an introduction to the skills required for both GCSE English Language exams. Descriptive, narrative and persuasive writing skills are also developed.

Spring Term 2 and Summer Term: Game of Thrones – Students return to the skills first introduced in the previous unit and begin to embed them. Students will have done mock exams prior to this unit and so now will focus on applying the acquired skills to specific questions within the exam. A wide range of fiction and non-fiction texts from the 19th, 20th and 21st Centuries are studied in order to: analyse language and structure; summarise and compare; develop critical opinions; model successful creative writing; develop inference skills and reading for information. Writing skills continue to be developed with a focus on writing to narrate, describe and persuade.

Summer term 2: NEA: Students will prepare and present a spoken presentation exploring their vision for the future of Britain. The most successful candidates will be well-versed in current affairs, the knowledge of which will support their explanations and arguments. Students will complete research and reflections on this topic throughout the year in preparation for the assessment. Assessment grades will appear on GCSE certificates at the end of Year 11.

Additional reading: Students should be encouraged to read as widely as possible in order to develop not only their reading skills, but their vocabulary and understanding of the importance of sentence structures and punctuation within writing.

Parental support: By encouraging students to read widely (both fiction and non-fiction) you will be providing valuable support to your children. Monitoring homework and raising any concerns with members of the English department are also useful ways to provide support.

 

GCSE English LITERATURE:

Autumn 1, 2 and Spring 1: ‘Charles Dickens’ – Students study A Christmas Carol. Students learn to analyse the use of language, structure and form, and link this to the context of Victorian England.

Spring 2 and Summer 1: ‘Shakespeare’ – Students study Macbeth. Students learn to analyse the use of staging, language, structure and form, and link this to the context of Elizabethan England.

Summer 2: Students briefly revisit A Christmas Carol and Macbeth to consolidate knowledge. They will then study poetry for Paper 2 of the examination.

Additional reading: Students can read any Charles Dickens novel in order to support their understanding of the set text, however Oliver Twist would be most useful as it contains many of the key themes explored in A Christmas Carol.

Students can read/watch and Shakespeare plays in order to support their understanding of the set text; however, those from the same genre (Tragedy) would be most useful, for example Othello.

Parental support: Where possible, theatre trips to see set texts performed live will be organised by the school, however extra visits to the theatre would be beneficial. Students are provided with copies of the set texts, but having their own copy at home for extra study would be useful.

 

YEAR 11:

GCSE English LANGUAGE:

Autumn Term: Students continue to focus on exam skills. In the lead up to their GCSE exams, students will revise all of the modules to date, completing exam-style questions and revision activities. Students will also complete fortnightly vocabulary acquisition lessons; these are aimed at enriching students’ active vocabulary, while consolidating their understanding of 19th century literature. There will be a mock examination during this term, so students are able monitor progress, and reflect upon areas to improve.

Spring Term: Exam skills – In the lead up to their GCSE exams, students will revise all of the modules to date, completing exam-style questions and revision activities. There will be a mock examination during this term, so students are able monitor progress, and reflect upon areas to improve. Students will also complete fortnightly vocabulary acquisition lessons; these are aimed at enriching students’ active vocabulary, while consolidating their understanding of 19th century literature.

Summer term: Exam skills – In the lead up to their GCSE exams, students will revise all of the modules to date, completing exam-style questions and revision activities. There will be a mock examination during this term, so students are able monitor progress, and reflect upon areas to improve. Students will also complete fortnightly vocabulary acquisition lessons; these are aimed at enriching students’ active vocabulary, while consolidating their understanding of 19th century literature.

Additional reading: Students should be reading a wide variety of non-fiction texts in order to develop their skills for their GCSE. These could be: blogs, newspapers, magazine articles etc.

Parental support: Parents could read with, or listen to students read. They could ask students to explain what they have learned from each text.

 

YEAR 11:

GCSE English LITERATURE:

Autumn Term: Students will revise A Christmas Carol and Macbeth; following this, they will complete a mock examination on both texts. An Inspector Calls, studying character, plot, narrative, social and historical contexts and the writer’s craft. There will be an additional mock examination on An Inspector Calls this term.

Spring Term: AQA Poetry Anthology and unseen poetry, studying character, plot, narrative, social and historical contexts and the writer’s craft.

Spring Term 2 and Summer term: Exam revision – Students revise all set texts: Macbeth, A Christmas Carol, An Inspector Calls, AQA Poetry Anthology. Students will complete exam style questions and revision activities.

Additional reading: Students can read any other novels by the author in order to support their understanding of the set text. Please note the following suggestions: understanding of A Christmas Carol can be developed with reading further Dickens, particularly Oliver Twist or Nicholas Nickleby; Othello compares well with Macbeth and extends students’ understanding of the nature of Tragedy.

Students can read/watch and Shakespeare plays in order to support their understanding of the set text; however, those from the same genre (Tragedy) would be most useful.

Parental support: Where possible, theatre trips to see set texts performed live will be organised by the school, however extra visits to the theatre would be beneficial. Students are provided with copies of the set texts, but having their own copy at home for extra study would be useful.

 

KEY STAGE 5

Autumn Term: Students will study the play Translations and the poetry anthology Skirrid Hill by Owen Sheers. They will also complete revision activities of texts already taught: Wuthering Heights, The Great Gatsby, Othello and AQA pre-1900 poetry. Skills for addressing unseen poetry and prose will be embedded.

Independent Study – Students complete a piece of coursework comparing an element of two texts of their choice. Students are encouraged to take a critical and analytical approach to their text. Writing skills are developed to focus on constructing effective arguments.

Spring Term: The Help by Kathryn Stockett and Skirrid Hill by Owen Sheers – Students conduct in-depth analysis of this text focusing on links to the genre and context as well as analysis of language, form and structure. Revision activities will be on-going.

Summer Term: Prior to the exam students revise all texts studied and prepare for the requirements of the exam through frequent practise exam papers, analysis of the success criteria for the exam and development of links and comparisons between the texts studied.

Additional reading: Students will benefit from wider reading of texts within the Gothic genre, examples may include Dracula, Wuthering Heights, Northanger Abbey, works by Edgar Allan Poe. Wider reading on the context of Jacobean England, Victorian England, the Industrial Revolution and Feminist Literary theory will all be useful.

Reading of non-fiction texts (broadsheet newspapers’ magazines) is useful in terms of developing a sophisticated style of writing.

Reading of fiction texts (poetry and prose) is useful in terms of developing their ability to respond to unseen texts and extracts.

Parental support: Where possible, theatre trips to see set texts performed live will be organised by the school, however extra visits to the theatre would be beneficial. Students are provided with copies of the set texts, but having their own copy at extra study and annotation would be useful.

 

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