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Bristnall Hall Academy, Bristnall Hall Lane
Oldbury, West Midlands B68 9PA

T: +44 0121 552 5425

E: principal@bha.attrust.org.uk

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Bristnall Hall Academy, Bristnall Hall Lane, Oldbury, West Midlands, B68 9PA

Subject Leader: J Mole

ICT contributes to BHA students SMSC development in various ways such as preparing children for the challenge of living and learning in a technologically enriched world and increasing their awareness of the moral dilemmas created by technological advances and establishing boundaries in society by considering what is acceptable. Whilst in Key Stage 3 students are now studying the new Computing curriculum. Students at Key Stage 4 are still following the ICT curriculum which focuses on developing their social, moral and ethical ideas and ICT skills.

 

Spiritual: Through programming, students begin to explore the patterns and relationships of data and its collection. Students acquire appreciation for the innovative achievements of computing pioneers; past and present and begin to understand how much computing can impact on their lives by learning about the context of what it is, where it came from, how it has inspired others and the possibilities for the future. In addition, students consider situations where computers perform better than people at certain activities. As part of the computing curriculum students are given inspiring experiences, such as taking a computer apart to find out what actually makes a computer what it is, to creating their own web design pages using various applications. This leads to moments of reflection and a sense of ‘wow from all students. Students explore creativity and imagination in the design and construction of digital products whilst promoting self-esteem through the presentation of their work to others.

Moral: education at BHA encourages good etiquette when using digital technology including mobile devices and with due regard to e-safety. In addition, encouraging respect for other people’s opinions and views. Students consider the effects of social networking and the consequences of cyber bullying and explore the promotion of moral issues around the use of digital technology covering copyright, plagiarism and the misuse and access rights to personal data.  In addition, students consider the implications and penalties associated with file sharing and illegal downloads. As part of the computing curriculum students are taught their rights and responsibilities for using the internet and being online, including the importance of passwords, file storage and privacy.

Social: As part of the computing curriculum students are taught to think and produce work that reflects the needs of diverse audiences within our community and the wider community. BHA encourages appropriate social behaviours in and outside of the classroom, including social networking.   Students are challenged to work collaboratively in groups, to assist each other when solving problems and to find solutions whilst developing respect for the ideas and opinions of other team members. Students learn about the traceability of internet history and the impact this can have for future jobs if students have anything negative on their own digital footprint. In addition, students Google themselves to look at its impact and why they must stay safe and protect themselves when using ICT.

Cultural: education at BHA promotes the fact we are living in a digitally cultural environment and encourages the sensible use of digital technology in and outside of the classroom from Year 7. In addition to empowering students to apply their ICT and computing skills and knowledge to the wider curriculum and acknowledge links between subjects, such as coordinates in programming and their connections with Maths and Geography. Students look at the culture impact of technology and the use of ICT in society, in particular the rise in social networking and the ability to communicate instantly across continents.

 

BHA Skills and Attributes Development

The following are skills within computing contexts you would expect a student to develop during their time at BHA:

    • problem solving & computational skills – the ability to solve problems by using mathematical and I.T. knowledge
  • practical skills & techniques – the ability to function in an I.C.T. environment using email, internet and commercial software packages and the ability to conceive, design and write computer programs in 2 programming languages

 

  • communication skills – the ability to communicate ideas, results and progress clearly and effectively both orally and in writing
  • creativity & team working – the ability to show creativity and innovation in solving unfamiliar problems either individually or with others
  • self-management skills & organisational skills – the ability to plan, schedule, co-ordinate resources and meet deadlines

More Able Students:

This GCSE Computing specification requires more able students to:

 

    • Understand and apply the fundamental principles and concepts of Computer Science, including abstraction, decomposition, and logic, algorithms, and data representation
    • Analyse problems in computational terms through practical experience of solving such problems, including designing, writing and debugging programs
    • Think creatively, innovatively, analytically, logically and critically
    • Understand the components that make up digital systems, and how they communicate with one another and with other systems
    • Understand the impacts of digital technology to the individual and to wider society
  • Apply mathematical skills relevant to Computer Science

 

Key Stage 3

Students follow a core programme of study for three hours a fortnight in years 7, 8 and 9. KS3 lessons are designed to provide natural progression into the courses taken at KS4. Students will develop practical ICT and computing skills as well as team-work, communication, problem-solving, presentation skills and the ability to reflect on and evaluate their own work and that of others. Students are introduced to computing through a clear framework of fun, student-friendly scenario based projects that combine elements of both Computing and ICT. Students also develop the skills they need to be confident digital citizens who understand the power of the digital world through E-Safety lessons at all key stages.

Assessment: consists of 6 progression pathway statements and learning outcomes. These statements are divided up into three strands of the Computing Curriculum: Computer Science, Information Technology, and Digital Literacy. All assessments take place at the end of each project.

Y7 Scheme of Work

  • Using ICT
  • Learning Blog
  • Computer Systems
  • Web Coding
  • Information Searching
  • My App
  • Game Control

Y8 Scheme of Work

  • Graphic Design
  • Databases
  • Computer Networks
  • Infographics
  • Media Computations
  • Game Design

Y9 Scheme of Work

  • Digital World
  • Web Authoring
  • Web Design
  • World of Technology
  • Text-based Programming

Additional Reading:

How parents can support:

Parents/career should encourage and ensure their children complete all set homework and are accessing online computing resources to reinforce their learning from the lessons each week. Home computers and internet access at home will further support their study and learning. Alternatively, encourage children to access computers during dedicated lunch time sessions. (Tue & Thurs)

All students will be taught to:

  • Understand a range of ways to use technology safely, respectfully, responsibly and securely, including protecting their online identity and privacy; recognise inappropriate content, contact and conduct and know how to report concerns.
  • Understand the hardware and software components that make up computer systems, and how they communicate with one another and with other systems
  • Create, re-use, revise and re-purpose digital artefacts for a given audience, with attention to trustworthiness, design and usability
  • Understand how instructions are stored and executed within a computer system; understand how data of various types (including text, sounds and pictures) can be represented and manipulated digitally, in the form of binary digits
  • Design, use and evaluate computational abstractions that model the state and behaviour of real-world problems and physical systems
  • Understand several key algorithms that reflect computational thinking [for example, ones for sorting and searching]; use logical reasoning to compare the utility of alternative algorithms for the same problem
  • Use two or more programming languages, at least one of which is textual, to solve a variety of computational problems; make appropriate use of data structures [for example, lists, tables or arrays]; design and develop modular programs that use procedures or functions
  • Understand simple Boolean logic [for example, AND, OR and NOT] and some of its uses in circuits and programming; understand how numbers can be represented in binary, and be able to carry out simple operations on binary numbers [for example, binary addition, and conversion between binary and decimal]

Extra-Curricular Activities

KS3 coding club Monday lunchtime

Catch-up Sessions – To help students achieve their high aspirational targets we offer additional support at lunch time for a range of year groups

Key Stage 4

In Key Stage 4, students opting for this curriculum area are offered courses catering to a wide range of student interests and learning preferences.   Students either study GCSE Computer Science (OCR) or Creative iMedia (OCR). The Creative iMedia courses place a strong emphasis on using computer applications to solve problems. The GCSE Computing course moves that emphasis to understanding and developing new software and goes to the heart of how a computer functions. More able students are encouraged to study the latter.

Creative iMedia

Creative iMedia teaches the use of digital technologies to create graphics, animation, sound, video, film, and television, digital photography, web development and gaming with IT at the forefront. Students will develop a wide range of skills across a variety of units using industry standard software such as Adobe Suite as well as learning how pre-production skills are used to create high quality products. Students also develop and apply their analytic, problem-solving, design, and computational thinking skills. This specification covers the blend of creativity and technicality of computing and provides students with specific and transferable skills and a solid foundation in understanding and applying this subject, whether it is in employment or higher education.

Assessment: Grades equivalent to GCSE grades A* – F are achievable on successful completion of the course. The course has 4 components.   One written exam and three externally assessed coursework units, of which, two are optional. All 4 units are worth 25% of the overall grade each.

 

Yr10

 

R081: Pre-production skills: students learn aspects of planning projects from Mood boards to Gantt Charts. It will also develop understanding of a client brief, time frames, deadlines and preparation techniques that form part of the planning and creation process.

 

Assessment: Compulsory External Examination. Written Paper January or June (Year 11)

 

R082: Creating digital graphics: students learn the fundamentals of creating digital graphics by editing photographs and images to suit given situations.

 

Assessment: Compulsory Controlled Assessment.

 

Y11

R085: Creating a multiple website: students learn about how web pages are designed and constructed. They will also be able to demonstrate their creativity by combining components to create a functional, intuitive and aesthetically pleasing website using Dreamweaver.

 

Assessment: Optional Controlled Assessment

 

R092: Developing digital games: students will examine the basics of creating digital games and their environments for the creative and digital media sector. They will also develop the know-how to create a playable game from an existing design or brief.

 

Assessment: Optional Controlled Assessment

 

R086: Creating a digital animation: students create graphics and animate them. They learn about frame-based animation and use software such as Adobe Flash or Serif DrawPlus to create their animation

 

Assessment: Optional Controlled Assessment.

 

R084: Storytelling with comic strips students will gain an understanding of various publishing companies. They will use their own ideas for original characters and produce their own small scale comic strip or novel.

Assessment: Optional Controlled Assessment.

 

A further 6 optional units are available to choose from:

 

  • R083: Creating 2D and 3D digital characters
  • R087: Creating interactive multimedia products
  • R088: Creating a digital sound sequence
  • R089: Creating a digital video sequence
  • R090: Digital photography
  • R091: Designing a game concept

 

For more information on this course please see the website:

http://www.ocr.org.uk/qualifications/creative-imedia-level-1-2-award-certificate-j807-j817/

Additional Reading:

  • Y10 Homework booklet & Y11 Revision bookletminimum 3/4 hours of revision/homework relating to topic every 2 weeks.
  • OCR Cambridge Nationals Creative iMedia Level1/2 Students’ text book.

 

    • http://www.teach-ict.com/imedia_home.html
  • Regular attendance to support sessions offered every Tuesday and Friday afterschool.

 

How parents can support:

Parents/career should encourage and ensure their children complete all set homework and are accessing online computing resources to reinforce their learning from the lessons each week. Home computers and internet access at home will further support their study and learning.

GCSE (9-1) Computer Science (OCR)

There is more to Computer Science than programming. This course provides an in-depth understanding of how computer technology works and a look at what goes on “behind the scenes”.
As part of this, you will investigate computer programming, which many learners find interesting.
The course will help learners develop critical thinking, analysis and problem solving skills. It will be a fun and interesting way to develop these skills, which can be transferred to other subjects and even applied in day-to-day life. The important elements of computer science are: principles of logic, decomposition, algorithms, data representation, and communication. Computational thinking is a large part of the course and forms the bulk of what is taught.   A good understanding of Maths is needed to help you on this course.

Assessment: This course is assessed on the new GCSE 9-1 grading scheme (9 being the top level). It also counts as one of the science subjects in the English Baccalaureate. Components 1 and 2 are individually assessed via external examinations worth 40% each (Written Papers – 1.5 hours). The final 20% of the grade is assessed by a programming project based on a task set by the examination board. (20 hours). Coursework submission and the external examination will be at the end of Year 11.

 

The subject content for this specification is divided into three components:

 

  • J276/01: External exam Computer Systems (40%)
  • J276/02:  External exam Computational thinking, algorithms and programming (40%)
  • J276/03/04: Programming project (20%)Topic One – Computer SystemsSystems Architecture – history, inputs & outputs, software, hardware and binary numbersNetworks – wired, wireless, routers, switches, NIC’s, Wi-Fi, virtual, topologies, protocols and layers.Functions of an Operating System – common utility programmes, open source and proprietaryFundamentals of a Computer System – reliability, professional standards, ethical & environmental considerations, legal considerations, cultural implications, binary and hexadecimal  Programming techniques – string manipulation, file handling, arrays, functions, procedures, data types and arithmetic and Boolean operatorsComputational logic – binary, truth tables and Boolean.Digital storage of text, images and sound including pixels, sampling and metadata.  Analysis – user and data requirements, objectives, abstraction, decomposition, test procedures and validation.Development – testing, refinement, evidence, technical terminology and concepts http://www.ocr.org.uk/qualifications/gcse-computer-science-j276-from-2016/
  • For more information on this course please see the website:
  • Testing and evaluation – critical analysis, evidence, justification
  • Design – Algorithms inputs, outputs, structures, data types, functions and techniques.
  • Programming technique – variables, operators, inputs, outputs, sequence, selection, iteration, count and controlled loops, data types, string manipulation, read, write, close, arrays, functions and sub-functions.
  • Topic 3 Programming Project
  • Translators and facilities of language – high level, low level, machine code, compilers, interpreters and assemblers.
  • Representation of Data – units, number conversions, hexadecimal, character sets, images and compression.
  • Robust programs – design considerations, syntax, logical errors, testing and test data.
  • Algorithms – computational thinking, abstraction, decomposition, algorithmic thinking, sorting, pseudo code and flow charts
  • Topic Two – Computational thinking, algorithms and programming
  • Databases – DBMS, tables and entities, logical operators, key fields and data validation.
  • Systems software – utility programs i.e. defragmentation, data compression etc.
  • Systems Security – encryption, malware, phishing, DNS, firewalls and passwords.
  • Computing Hardware – ram and rom, clock speed, storage devices and memory
  •  

Additional Reading:

  • Y10 Homework booklet & Y11 Revision bookletminimum 3/4 hours of revision/homework relating to topic every 2 weeks.
  • OCR Computing for GCSE students’ text book
  • OCR My Revision Notes for GCSE Computer Systems and Programming
  • Cambridge GCSE Computing MOOC (Massive Open Online Course)
  • Regular attendance to support sessions offered every Tuesday and Friday afterschool.

 

How parents can support:

Parents/career should encourage and ensure their children complete all set homework and are accessing online computing resources to reinforce their learning from the lessons each week. Home computers and internet access at home will further support their study and learning.

Catch-up Sessions – To help students achieve their high aspirational targets we offer additional support at lunch time for a range of year groups

Key Stage 5

Creative iMedia is a challenging qualification aimed at students interested in the creative and digital media sectors, such as those preparing to work as: systems architects, web designers, graphic designers, multimedia producers, animators, sound engineers and editors, video producers, game designers, software developers, scripters and story-boarders. Creative iMedia involves computer-based work in a more creative and practical form; from video editing to photography and web design. The course will allow for a wide range of skills to be developed based around today’s employment market.

The qualification aims to:

  • Develop candidates’ knowledge of a range of different software application types
  • Develop the ability to use different applications effectively to meet a customer’s specified requirements
  • Develop candidates’ ability to manage information
  • Develop candidates’ ability to plan, prioritize and evaluate work tasks effectively
  • Develop candidates’ skills, knowledge and testing in contexts that are directly relevant to employment situations.Assessment: Y12
  • This could be achieved through studying the following units:
  • There is no examination assessment for this qualification. Assessment is spilt across four sections: Research, Planning, Implementing, and Evaluation and this is the same for all units. Assessment is based upon the standard of work produced, through written work, presentations and practical assignments. To achieve this qualification a minimum of 45 credits is needed of which a minimum of 27 credits must be achieved at Level 3; the remaining credits can be at Level 2 or 3. Unit 301 and Unit 302 are mandatory units. This will be completed before the end of Y12 or Y13 to allow for refinement of work.
  • 301 – Pre Production Skills (6 credits)
  • 302 – Digital Media skills (7 credits)
  • 313 – Digital Graphics Editing (5 credits)
  • 311 – Developing and enhanced website (6 credits)

 

Y13

  • 314S – Digital Sound (6 credits)
  • 314V –Creating a digital video sequence (6 credits)
  • 315 – Games Design (6 credits) or 306 Storytelling with comic books (6 credits)
  • 317 – Digital Photography (6 credits)

 

For more information on this course please see the website:

http://www.ocr.org.uk/qualifications/vocational-qualifications-qcf-creative-imedia-level-3-award-04310/

How parents can support:

Parents/career should encourage and ensure their children complete all set homework and are accessing online computing resources to reinforce their learning from the lessons each week. Home computers and internet access at home will further support their study and learning.

Catch-up Sessions – To help students achieve their high aspirational targets we offer additional support at lunch time for a range of year groups

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